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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    6,342

    Default Laxatives and Cutting Weight

    I've never been involved in a sport where I felt it necessary to cut weight. I'm sure if I had competed at much higher level in boxing or judo this likely would have become a common practice for me as it is for some who do compete at that level.

    Since I have an interest in anything health related I decided to do a little research after another member mentioned the use of laxatives for cutting weight. Anytime someone says that it's okay to use drugs to increase performance or help one achieve something they couldn't otherwise accomplish it raises alarms with me.

    Now I realize that not all drug use is abused and some may use it in a very controlled and limited way, but here's a heads up in case someone believes that there is no real danger to using laxatives:

    Youth wrestling puts kids at risk for extreme weight-loss practices. Wrestlers may try to "cut" weight in order to compete in a lower weight class, where they think they may have an advantage against a smaller opponent. But some weight-loss practices may be harmful to their health as well as their sport performance.

    Each state has weight-loss guidelines for wrestlers. Before the season begins, wrestlers must undergo a medical evaluation to determine the lowest weight at which they can safely wrestle during the season.

    Most short-term weight-loss methods involve reducing water weight by restricting fluid intake and using diuretics to increase urination. But wrestlers may also try more drastic measures for rapid weight loss, including:

    * Fasting
    * Using saunas or rubber or plastic workout suits to sweat off water weight
    * Vomiting
    * Laxatives

    All of these methods can have serious health consequences for kids, such as:

    * Dehydration
    * Heat exhaustion or heat stroke
    * Low blood sugar
    * Fainting
    * Electrolyte imbalance
    * Calcium imbalance
    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cutting-weight/AN01015
    Last edited by Skinnyboy; 01-06-2007 at 03:55 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    64,840

    Default

    I'm anti-weight cutting and especially using drugs to manipulate the body such as laxatives, diuretics, etc.... As for laxatives, just consider how weak and bad you feel when you have the drizzling sh*ts and then imagine doing that on purpose to cut weight, then try and fight a day later. You'd have to feel sick.

  3. #3

    Default

    If you're cutting weight properly and eating well, then laxitives and diuretics will have VERY little effect on you once you rehydrate and eat again. VERY little.

    It's dangerous for someone who eats fast food consistently or eats poorly and relies on "big drops" to make weight. Those are the people who tend to perform poorly as well.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    6,342

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BulldogWrestler
    If you're cutting weight properly and eating well, then laxitives and diuretics will have VERY little effect on you once you rehydrate and eat again. VERY little.

    It's dangerous for someone who eats fast food consistently or eats poorly and relies on "big drops" to make weight. Those are the people who tend to perform poorly as well.

    I'm not going to argue your experience Bulldog. And I don't have any in this area.

    But isn't it common for a lot of fighters who cut weight to sometimes resort to extreme measures (such as laxatives) when losing the pounds becomes difficult? How many would use it in a discplined manner such as yourself?

    I would imagine, to a lesser degree, it's like using steroids. If you have a discplined approach, good advice, and information then it reduces the risk of negative consequences. BUT, what is the probability of that scenario for most users since it's largely illegal and outwardly frowned upon?

    This is why I think they should legalize the works. That way kids can go to a doctor (or bring experts into schools) and get the proper advice, warnings, etc. Wouldn't solve the abuse problem, but it would go a long ways to helping kids make educated decisions about using such drugs.

  5. #5

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    I'm no health expert. No training whatsoever in the area, I'm just speaking from my own personal experiences - which I'm sure are vastly different then from most.

    I walk around (now) at around 185 or so.I was a bit lighter in college, maybe 165 or so. I wrestled 133 and 141 in college. 149 my freshman year. I wrestled division I, and most of the guys I was wrestling with were my size cutting about the same as I was.

    I cannot testify to laxatives or diuretics being harmful. I was never harmed or subject to someone being harmed while using them.

    I regularly used both of them to nix weight, and never had a problem. Then again, I've used sauna suits plenty of times and never had an experience with them, but have known people who have. So...take it for what it's worth.

    I think with responsible use, it isn't a problem though.

    Losing pounds isn't difficult if you diet and exercise and train correctly. Your body will respond in how you treat it. Treat it harshly, it responds harshly. Most diuretics and laxatives cause the body to do what it naturally already does. If used the way they're recommended, I don't see how it can cause a problem. I dunno know though, like I said - I'm no expert.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    13,944

    Default

    yeah I never used laxatives to cut weight...wrestling practice alone was enough to strip most of the fat off your body and I was able to cut 10lbs of water weight for morning weigh ins running in my basement...

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